Tesla’s new futuristic Cybertruck spotted cruising around Sydney but it’s not everyone’s ‘cup of tea’

Elisia Seeber
The Nightly
Tesla fan Kevin Ngo noticed the Cybertruck parked on a street in northern Sydney, taking to the Tesla Owners Australia group on Facebook to post photos as quickly as he could. 
Tesla fan Kevin Ngo noticed the Cybertruck parked on a street in northern Sydney, taking to the Tesla Owners Australia group on Facebook to post photos as quickly as he could.  Credit: Kevin Ngo

Tesla’s very own version of the Batmobile has arrived in Australia.

The company’s latest electric creation — the Cybertruck — was spotted cruising around Sydney on Friday as part of a publicity stunt for the opening of a new showroom in Rosebery, in the city’s southeast.

It is labelled a “pick-up truck”, but seems far from it, with an angular futuristic design, lowered body and ultra-hard stainless-steel exterior — it looks more like a military vehicle than what an Aussie would call a ute. But like a ute, it does boast a hidden 6’ by 4’ tray.

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Marketed as being, “built for any planet”, Tesla describes the Cybertruck as “durable and rugged enough to go anywhere” and “able to tackle anything”.

The vehicle’s “armour glass can resist the impact of a baseball at 112 km/h or class four hail”. While its “acoustic glass helps make the cabin as quiet as outer space”.

When the vehicle was launched, Tesla founder and chief executive Elon Musk said the truck was “a better truck than a truck and a better sports car than a sports car”.

He described it as a “rare” and “seemingly impossible” achievement.

“I think it’s our best product,” Musk said in November. “I think it’s the most unique thing on the road. And finally, the future will look like the future.”

Earlier today, Tesla fan Kevin Ngo noticed the Cybertruck parked on a street in northern Sydney, taking to the Tesla Owners Australia group on Facebook to post photos as quickly as he could.

Some viewers in the club were excited to see the new vehicle on the streets, with one commenting, “Book me in for a test” and another adding, “That would certainly attract some attention”.

But others were a bit unsure, “Great, another truck that doesn’t fit in the white lines,” one viewer wrote, while another Facebook user commented, “Not my cup of tea, that’s for sure.”

Tesla wants to launch the Cybertruck Down Under but it’s facing regulatory hurdles because it doesn’t fit Australian design rules. There have also been other issues with the Cybertruck truck, with the first 4000 all being recalled for a sticking accelerator pedal.

The Cybertruck — worth $US81,895 ($125,500) and $101,985 ($156,000) — is listed on the Australian Tesla website but it’s not yet available to order, with Aussie buyers also having to wait until US demand eases before getting their hands on one.

Electric and hybrid utes have been slower to arrive in Australia than SUVs and hatchbacks, though several automakers have confirmed plans to launch the vehicles within the next two years, including Ford, GWM and BYD.

Isuzu has also announced plans to bring a D-Max Electric ute to Australia, and local distributor AusEV has started taking orders for converted versions of the Ford F-150 Lightning electric ute sold in the US.

— With files from AAP

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