Community Protection Board report reveals only 68 non-citizens have curfews imposed

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Katina Curtis
The Nightly
2 Min Read
Ninette Simons was targeted in a horrific attack on April 16 when three men allegedly entered her Girrawheen home pretending to be police officers. 
Ninette Simons was targeted in a horrific attack on April 16 when three men allegedly entered her Girrawheen home pretending to be police officers.  Credit: The West Australian

Just 68 of the 153 non-citizens released from immigration detention after a High Court decision in 2023 are subject to curfews.

The first monthly report from the Community Protection Board was published on Friday, four months after it was established.

It shows that 76 of the people on the visas created to keep track of the cohort, known as Bridging (Removal Pending) or BVRs, were required to wear electronic ankle monitors in April.

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The Government’s handling of the group has come under intense scrutiny in recent weeks after it was alleged the one of the former detainees, Majid Jamshidi Doukoshkan, was accused of bashing 73-year-old Perth woman Ninette Simons during a home invasion.

Doukoshkan was charged in February with breaching the curfew imposed in his visa conditions but the charges were dropped in March when the visa had to be reissued because of a technical bungle.

The reissued visa no longer required him to wear an ankle monitor, which the Government has said was done on the advice of the community safety board.

The board has met 15 times since it was established in December, with six of those meetings – more than a third of the total – held in April.

Its report states that decisions makers “carefully consider” the board’s recommendations and “any other relevant information” to determine what conditions should be imposed on each of the 153 people’s visas.

“Every individual is monitored. Monitoring occurs through either the electronic monitoring condition … or the mandatory reporting condition … which requires the individual to report to the Department at specified times,” the report says.

“Individuals are regularly reviewed by the Board to ensure that the conditions and the individual’s behaviour in the community can be further considered, and the Board recommends changes to BVR conditions where required.”

The WA Government released figures earlier in the month showing that of the 20 people in the State on BVRs, 10 were wearing ankle monitors.

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