‘No go’ waterways as sewage floods pools and beaches following record rainfalls in Sydney

Matt Shrivell
The Nightly
2 Min Read
Sydney's waterways have been filled with sewage after huge rain storms on the weekend.
Sydney's waterways have been filled with sewage after huge rain storms on the weekend. Credit: Instagram.

Some of the most popular waterways in the nation are currently being overrun with sewage in the aftermath of Sydney’s wild weekend weather.

Hardy winter bathers and surf sports enthusiasts have been asked to stay dry and avoid potential exposure to the sewage which has pooled in large amounts around the ‘harbour city’.

Dozens of popular swimming spots have been affected by sewage overflow and stormwater pollution after the city experienced record rainfalls on Saturday.

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Clontarf Pool has been heavily affected and swimmers have been told not to enter the water there.

“Some swim sites may be impacted by stormwater pollution,” Beachwatch NSW said.

“Always check for signs of pollution such as discolouration, flowing drains, open lagoons, floating debris and odours before swimming.”

“Pollution from stormwater and sewage overflows can cause higher levels of faecal contamination that makes water quality unsuitable for swimming.”

Pollution is evident at several beaches and the water quality is unsuitable for swimming with high levels also reported at dozens more sites.

“Pollution from stormwater and sewage overflows can cause higher levels of faecal contamination that makes water quality unsuitable for swimming,” Beachwatch said.

“Swimming in polluted water can expose you to disease-causing microorganisms which can make you unwell.”

The warnings come after heavy rains smashed Sydney over the weekend.

“Rainfall has an important effect on flowrates in sewerage systems and stormwater drains,” NSW Environment and Heritage said.

The NSW Environment and Heritage Department added other toxic substances could be contained in urban stormwater runoff, including plant fertilisers, pesticides and chemicals from building sites and gardens.

People were urged on Monday morning to avoid the following swimming spots: Barrenjoey Beach, Elvina Bay, Bayview Baths, Narrabeen Lagoon, Davidson Reserve, Gurney Crescent Baths, Northbridge Baths, Clontarf Pool, Forty Baskets Pool, Balmoral Baths, Clifton Gardens, Parsley Bay, Rose Bay Beach, Murray Rose Pool, Hayes Street Beach, Greenwich Baths, Dawn Fraser Pool, Woolwich Baths, Woodford Bay, Tambourine Bay, Chiswick Baths, Cabarita Beach, Congwong Bay, Frenchmans Bay, Yarra Bay, Foreshores Beach, Kyeemagh Baths, Brighton Le Sands Baths, Monterey Baths, Ramsgate Baths, Dolls Point Baths, Sandringham Baths, Carss Point Baths, Oatley Bay Baths, Jewfish Bay Baths, Gymea Bay Baths, Gunnamatta Bay Baths, Lilli Pilli Baths, and Horderns Beach.

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